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Our Products

TABLES
All our products are dry in camera and made of different types of wood.

For prices and more information contact us at our phone number or email.
PLANKS
All our products are dry in camera and made of different types of wood.

For prices and more information contact us at our phone number or email.
TONGUE AND GROOVE
All our products are dry in camera and made of different types of wood.

For prices and more information contact us at our phone number or email.
SKIRTING
All our products are dry in camera and made of different types of wood.

For prices and more information contact us at our phone number or email.
KITS OF PALETS
7 tables above and 3 below 3 and 4 paddles or blocks with double sided boards or single.

All our products are kiln dried and made of different types of wood.

We do it at your request
(Plane needed).

For prices and more information contact us at our phone number or email.
DOOR FRAMES
Contains 2 columns and 1 head of 100 cm.

All our products are kiln dried and other types of wood.

We do it at your request
(Plane needed).

For prices and more information contact us at our phone number or email.
WOOD DECKING
All our products are dry in camera and made of different types of wood.

For prices and more information contact us at our phone number or email.
WOODEN FENCE
We do it at your request.

All our products are dry in camera and made of different types of wood.

For prices and more information contact us at our phone number or email.
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Our Woods

PINUS CARIBAEA

Common name (s): caribbean pine

Scientific name: Pinus caribaea

Distribution: Central America and the Caribbean; also grown in plantations around the world

Tree size: 65-100 feet (20-30 m) tall, 2-3 feet (.6-1 m) trunk diameter

Average dry weight: 39 lbs / ft3 (625 kg / m3)

Specific gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .51, .63

Hardness Janka: 1,110 lbf (4,920 N)

Break module: 13,340 lbf / in2 (92.0 MPa)

Elastic modulus: 1,745,000 lbf / in2 (12.03 GPa) Compressive strength: 7,890 lbf / in2 (54.4 MPa)

Contraction: radial: 6.3%, tangential: 7.8%, volumetric: 12.9%, ratio T / R: 1.2

Color / Appearance: the heartwood is reddish brown, the sapwood is yellowish white and is distinct from the heartwood.

Grain / Texture: straight grain with a medium to thick texture and a greasy feel.

Final grain: large resin channels, numerous and uniformly distributed, mainly solitary; transition from early wood to abrupt latewood, high color contrast; diameter of medium-large tracheid.

Resistance to putrefaction: The heartwood is classified as moderately resistant to decomposition.

Ease of work: in general, Caribbean Pine works quite well with most tools, although resin can gum up tools and clog sandpaper. The Caribbean pine sticks and ends well.

Smell: Caribbean pine has a strong smell of resin while working.

Allergies / Toxicity: Work with pine has been reported to cause allergic skin reactions and / or asthma-like symptoms in some people. See the articles Wood allergies and Toxicity and safety against wood dust for more information.

Prices / Online: The Caribbean pine is an important commercial species that is grown in plantations around the world. Caribbean Pine should be available throughout its native range for a modest price.

Sustainability: this species of wood is not included in the CITES Appendices, and IUCN considers it a species of least concern.

Common uses: paper (pulpwood), sheet metal, plywood, flooring and lumber.

Comments: Although it is technically not a southern yellow pine, Caribbean pine is closely related to other pine species found in the southeastern United States that commonly come together as southern yellow pine, such as Longleaf, Shortleaf, Loblolly and Slash Pine.

MANILKARA BIDENTATA (PURGUO)

Common name (s): Bulletwood, Massaranduba, Purguo

 

Scientific name: Manilkara bidentata

 

Distribution: Caribbean, Central and South America

 

Tree size: 100-150 feet (30-46 m) tall, 2-4 feet (.6-1.2 m) trunk diameter

 

Average dry weight: 67 lbs / ft3 (1,080 kg / m3)

 

Specific gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .85, 1.08

 

Hardness Janka: 3,130 lbf (13,920 N)

 

Break module: 27,870 lbf / in2 (192.2 MPa)

 

Elastic Module: 3,344,000 lbf / in2 (23.06 GPa)

 

Compressive strength: 12,930 lbf / in2 (89.2 MPa)

Contraction: radial: 6.7%, tangential: 9.4%, volumetric: 16.8%, ratio T / R: 1.4

 

Color / Appearance: The heartwood is a medium to dark reddish brown. The color tends to darken with age. The yellow sapwood is clearly distinguished from the heartwood, although it is not always markedly demarcated.

 

Grain / Texture: straight grain to nailed or corrugated. Fine and uniform texture with low natural shine.

 

Final Grain: Diffuse-porous; radial multiples of 2-5 in common; medium to large pores, few; lime trees and common mineral deposits; diffuse parenchyma in aggregates, reticulated; narrow rays, spacing quite close.

 

Resistance to putrefaction: classified as very durable, with good resistance to most insect attacks. Susceptible to marine borers.

 

Working capacity: despite its high density, Purguo generally produces good results with manual and mechanical tools, although it has an opacity effect higher than the average in the cutters. It responds well to the bending of steam. It can present challenges in gluing due to the high density and oil content.

 

Smell: No characteristic odor.

 

Allergies / Toxicity: Although severe reactions are uncommon, Purguo has been reported to cause skin irritation. See the articles Wood allergies and Toxicity and safety against wood dust for more information.

 

Price / Order: Infrequently imported, Purguo is sometimes available as a platform or floorboards. Expect prices to be in the middle to upper range for imported hardwood.

 

Sustainability: this species of wood is not included in the CITES Appendices or the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

 

Common uses: heavy cover (within its natural range), covers, floors, boat construction, bent pieces and flipped objects.

 

Comments: Purguo is an incredibly strong and dense wood that has good durability in exterior applications.

 

 

TECTONA GRANDIS

 

Common name (s): teak, Burmese teak

Scientific name: Tectona grandis

Distribution: native of South Asia; Widely grown in plantations in tropical regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America.

Tree size: 100-130 feet (30-40 m) tall, 3-5 feet (1-1.5 m) trunk diameter

Average dry weight: 41 lbs / ft3 (655 kg / m3)

Specific gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .55, .66

Hardness Janka: 1,070 lbf (4,740 N)

Rupture Module: 14,080 lbf / in2 (97.1 MPa)

Elastic Module: 1,781,000 lbf / in2 (12.28 GPa)

Compressive strength: 7,940 lbf / in2 (54.8 MPa)

Contraction: Radial: 2.6%, tangential: 5.3%, volumetric: 7.2%, ratio T / R: 2.0

Color / Appearance: The heartwood tends to be golden or medium brown, with colors that darken with age.

Grain / Texture: The grain is straight, although occasionally it may be wavy or interlaced. Coarse, irregular texture and natural brightness from moderate to low. Unprocessed, unprocessed wood surfaces have a slightly oily or greasy feel due to natural oils.

Final Grain: Ring-porous or semi-ring-porous; early lonely wood pores from large to very large, late pores from medium to large, few; solitary and in radial multiples of 2-3; linden trees and other deposits of heartwood (light colored) common; medium rays visible without lens, normal spacing; Vasictric parenchyma, and ringed (marginal), with bands sometimes wide enough to enclose entire pores of early wood.

Resistance to putrefaction: teak has been considered by many as the gold standard for resistance to decay, and its heartwood is considered very durable. Teak is also resistant to termites, although it is only moderately resistant to marine borers and powder beetles.

Ease of work: easy to work in almost all aspects, with the only warning that the teak contains a high level of silica (up to 1.4%) that has a pronounced erasing effect on the cutting edges. Despite its natural oils, teak usually sticks and ends well, although in some cases it may be necessary to clean the surface of the wood with a solvent before gluing / finishing to reduce the natural oils on the surface of the wood.

Smell: teak may have a leather-like odor when freshly ground.

Allergies / Toxicity: Although severe reactions are rare, Teca has been reported to be a sensitizer. In general, the most common reactions include irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract, as well as other health effects, such as conjunctivitis, rash, nausea, asthma-like symptoms and visual effects.

Price / availability: despite its widespread cultivation in plantations around the world, teak is very expensive. It is perhaps one of the most expensive woods on the market, at least for large wood and without figures. Other woods are more expensive, but are usually only available in small pieces (ie, Gaboon Ebony or Snakewood), or are valued only by the shape of their grain (ie, burl woods, Pommele Sapele or Waterfall Bubinga).

Sustainability: this species of wood is not included in the CITES Appendices or the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common uses: Construction of boats and boats, sheet metal, furniture, exterior construction, carvings, turns and other small wooden objects.

Comments: Sometimes called Burmese Teak, this name is used to differentiate the trees grown naturally (usually from Myanmar, also known as Burma) from the teak grown in the plantations. Used extensively in India and within its natural range for centuries, teak has become a favorite throughout the world. With its excellent stability, good resistance properties, ease of work and, above all, its excellent resistance to rot and decomposition, it is not surprising that teak is among the most desired trees in the world.

Like the many names and imitations of Mahogany, the nickname "Teak" has been placed and assigned to a series of different woods that seek acclaim. The usual procedure is to take a wood with a certain resemblance to teak and insert a geographical location in front of the name. For example, Cumaru is sometimes known as Brazilian Teak, while Teak of Rhodesia has little botanical relationship with Teak-Tectona grandis real. The name Burma Teak, however, refers to genuine teak.

ERISMA UNCINATUM

 

Common Name: Mureillo

Scientific Name: Erisma uncinatum

Group: Plants »Trees» Evergreen Tree

Location: Pando

Distribution: Tropical humid forest, subtropical humid forest, Santa Cruz, Beni, Pando.

General Characteristics of the Tree: Height up to 30 m medium cup, tall trunk, straight and cylindrical.

General Characteristics of the Wood: Differentiated and broad sap, grayish white color, heartwood light pink to light purple brown, straight fiber coarse grain.

Physical Properties:

Density at 12% CH: 0.60 gr / cm3

Basic density: 0.46 median

Total radial contraction: 3.36%

Total shrinkage, tangential: 8.87%

Rate T / R 2.63 stable wood

Mechanical Properties: (12% CH)

Breakage force in static bending: 649 kg / cm2

Modulus of elasticity in static flexion: 99.075 kg / cm2

Breakage force in parallel comprehension: 348 kg / cm2

Lateral hardness: 327 kg.

Workability: Drying without major risks; risks of deformation and slight cracks, easy sawing, slightly abrasive wood, good gluing, good surface finish is achieved.

Preservation and Natural Durability: Total and uniform absorption in pressure treatment, low resistance to rot; bad resistance to the attack of termites and good to the attack of fungi and insects of dry wood.

Uses and Applications: Doors and windows. Frames for doors, Moldings, Panels, Joinery, Furniture, Drawers, Turning.

Pinos de Venezuela | Upata, Estado Bolivar | +58-414-562-53-94 , +58-414-159-73-50